Hope in 2016: How the Church can #BringBackHisGirls

The year of 2015 was one of many new beginnings for the country of Nigeria. Some of the biggest ones were:

  • The election of Muhammadu Buhari as president of Nigeria. In March of 2015, after delaying election day by six weeks due to national security and Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) preparedness worries, General Buhari won out against Goodluck Jonathan, the president at the time. At the time of his election, men and women alike celebrated the victory, ushering Buhari in with the sounds of shouts, songs, and chants proclaiming, “Change! Change!” and “Sai (Only) Buhari!”
  • Other positive changes abounded, too: the Nigerian army, along with the Multinational Joint Task Force, routed– and ruined– Boko Haram’s caliphate, pushing them into smaller territories of land, and degrading the insurgency’s offense to sporadic, soft-target suicide bombings (source).
  • Slum-like IDP camps, stuffed with displaced peoples from the insurgency in 2014, were investigated for human trafficking offenses; and, displaced peoples from many settlements in the foreign surrounding countries were encouraged to make their trek back home in the fall of 2015 (source).

In President Buhari’s live media chat on December 30th, 2015, many of these things, along with corruption and the economy, were all discussed, but there was one subject whose lack of information– truly, lack of change–  was cause for disappointment.

For every victory stated above, there is still one incredibly important cause that saw little to no physical developments in the year of 2015.

Over one year and 250 days later, 219 schoolgirls from Chibok, Nigeria– 219 individual hearts, minds, and souls– remain missing.

When asked about the girls’ well being, the answer is solemn.
“No credible information.” [1]

In all 365 days of the year 2015, the public has not seen or heard any truly verified updates regarding the girls. Yet, there is hope. 

Continue reading

Advertisements