9/11, TWENTY YEARS LATER

My heart breaks over those who lost someone that fateful day, twenty years ago.

Now, as we face the Taliban in Afghanistan, natural disasters everywhere, and other horrific things, it can be easy to forget what happened to America on September 11th, 2001. But today, let’s take some time to reflect, to grieve, and to remember.

With Love, in Christ,

Annalee Hoover, ISAIAH 62 PRAYER MINISTRY


Do you know Jesus?

Things change, but our God does not. Learn more about the God who never changes, no matter the situation, here.

Unity in the Church When it Hurts

There have been incredibly tragic things going on around the world… and my question is, what has the world-wide church been doing about it?

This is not to shame the churches where these disastrous things have happened; it is to remind ourselves that as Christians, we belong to one another. We are one.

I came to this conclusion after reading 1 Corithians 16:19:

“The churches in the province of Asia send you greetings. Aquila and Priscilla greet you warmly in the Lord, and so does the church that meets at their house.”

The churches in the province of Asia had never even met the Corinthians, much less been in a place to send greetings. Again, Priscilla and Aquila greeted these people warmly. Churches thousands of miles away from eachother greeted one another with love and warmth!

Can we, as apart of this worldwide Christian Church, do the same, helping our brothers and sisters in need?

I commend those in the Church who have stepped out of their comfort zones and went out to help the many hurting people all over the world right now.

And even if we cannot physically go help these people, we can pray– in fact, it should be the first thing we are doing!

Will you pray with me, here?

“Dear Father God, we come to You on behalf of our brothers and sisters who are hurting all over the world. We pray for Your Comfort, Strength, Wisdom, Guidance, and Protection over them. Please show us how we can practically help. In Jesus’ Name we pray, amen.”

To help Nigerians, you can check out my list of reputable donors here. The Red Cross and Convoy of Hope are also providing practical help for those in pain and tragedy right now. I recommend them (none of my recommendations come from donations or are paid advertisments).


Do you know Jesus?

Jesus never said life would be easy, but that He has overcome the world (John 16:33). Learn more about Jesus and His Gospel, at isaiah62blog.com/do-you-know-Jesus.

Clinging to God: Prayer for Tania Avalos

Tonight, I was truly brought to tears by the story of a woman named Tania Avalos, a woman who lost her husband and daughter while trying to cross the Rio Grande into US immigration. Her story was made public when this picture of her husband and daughter was taken in June of 2019.

This woman, in her interview on 60 Minutes (found here), wanted first to talk about her faith in God and how He is pulling her through. My heart filled so full for her. Because this is not about politics…. this is not about twisting and perverting stories. It is about a deeply hurt woman, choosing to cling to her God through the most heartbreaking event of her entire life.

I pray that I would have the faith of Tania. I cannot imagine her pain. Can we just lift her, her family, and her loved ones up in prayer?


Do you know Jesus?

Tragedies such as these break Jesus’ Heart. He knows every tear that Tania– and all of us– has shed. Learn more about Jesus’ great Love for you, here.


Many Sorrows: Suffering in Light of the Cross

The city of Maiduguri never saw it coming. Even if they did, the city had little to nothing to stop or prevent it from occurring. Friday, July 31st at 6:30 AM, a bomb blast in Maiduguri caused the whole city to shake and stir with panic. Being set off at the densely populated Gamboru marketplace, the suicide bombing killed 8 people, while injuring countless others.

Said to be a woman, this suicide bomber was not suspicious in the slightest; yet, the effect she had on those around her will forever haunt her survivors. For people in Maiduguri (and Northern Nigeria in general), no place is safe anymore. What once used to be a place no one feared going to– and in fact, needed– has now become a place of trauma and horror for everyone who has ever walked its roads. Bloodied or not, the trauma Nigerians have suffered is both painfully real– and much more than skin deep.

The thought that something so horribly devastating could happen within a few seconds seems unfathomable. But, it is surprisingly true for many, if not all, horrific, life-changing experiences: what happens in only a few moments amounts to a lifetime of pain, grief, and sorrow. And while, in many cases, the perpetrator is the only one who suffers from their mistakes, the much more common (and incredibly unjust) reality of it all is that victims are the ones who suffer most. Innocent people are caught in the crossfire– and are forced to live with the repercussions for the rest of their lives. In many ways, this could have been what Jesus meant when He told His disciples that “In this life, you will have tribulation” (John 16:33); though Jesus’ warning is honest, the question still remains: when real tribulation hits, how do we cope? Continue reading